Yarrow to treat wounds, anxiety, stress and others (8 benefits)
yarrow

Yarrow to treat wounds, anxiety, stress and others (8 benefits)

YARROW TO TREAT WOUNDS, ANXIETY, STRESS, AND OTHERS

Yarrow to treat wounds, anxiety, tension and othersYarrow is a flower that belongs to the sunflower family and is closely related to chamomile and chrysanthemum. This rich flower has been used all over the world since time immemorial. Traditionally, this plant is eaten as tea, and if we want to mention some of its most important benefits, we can mention reducing inflammation (especially in the digestive system), treating skin wounds, and relieving anxiety, stress, and insomnia.

In previous centuries, yarrow was not very popular, for example, in the 17th century, it was prepared and consumed like spinach. It was not well received and not many people enjoyed its unique benefits.

Do you like tarragon? Yarrow has a similar taste and can be used in recipes in place of tarragon. With its sweet and spicy taste at the same time, it not only makes recipes more attractive but also strengthens their antioxidant content.

Related article: Acupuncture to treat stress
What is it?

Achillea millefolium is an evergreen plant of the Asteraceae family. This plant is native to the temperate regions of North Korea, including North America, Europe, and Asia. It is a plant known for its thousand leaves with flowers colored in red, pink, yellow, and white. In nature, you will typically see white and yellow yarrow more often than others. Its height may reach 60 to 120 cm.

Other common names for this plant are common yarrow, thousand leaf yarrow, gordaldo, devil’s nettle…

Its flowers and leaves are rich in nutrients and phytonutrients. Phytonutrients are chemical compounds that occur naturally in plants.

Studies show that it contains some fortifying and anti-inflammatory phytochemicals, including flavonoids, carotenoids, and terpenes. Examples of plant-derived antioxidants include:

  • Luteolin
  • Apigenin
  • Castiesin
  • Santoridine
  • artemitin
  • sesquiterpenoids
  • Politen
  • Isopolitin
  • Deacetyl Matricaria
  • cilastatin

A study published in Food Chemistry in 2013 found that commercial yarrow contains higher levels of saturated fatty acids, fats, protein, energy, sugars, and flavonoids, while yarrow contains higher levels of carbohydrates, saturated fats, and fatty acids. Organic are unsaturated fatty acids, tocopherols, and phenolic acids.

ITS HEALING PROPERTIES 

  1. HELPS PROTECT THE SKIN AND HEAL WOUNDS

Yarrow to treat wounds, anxiety, stress and others

The yarrow plant has been used for centuries for its wound-healing properties. You might be wondering why it is good for skin health? According to studies, this is an anti-inflammatory plant that has a positive effect on the pH of the skin and its moisture content. In addition, it is a natural antiseptic that prevents wound infections and injuries. That is why it is used as the main ingredient in antiseptic ointments.

The chemical hedge in this plant is also known for its ability to prevent bleeding. Studies show that if you sprinkle the powder on wounds, it not only prevents bleeding but also reduces pain from the injury.

This plant can also help treat a wide range of skin conditions including hemorrhoids, rashes, and cracks in the skin. Some research has shown that yarrow oil can heal wounds caused by burns with napalm (a flammable liquid used in warfare).

Read also:  10 benefits of aloe vera for the skin

  1. HELPS TREAT MENOPAUSE

Yarrow to treat wounds, anxiety, tension and others

Surprisingly, yarrow falls into the category of herbal medicine that is used to encourage bleeding in certain health conditions. One of these conditions, amenorrhea, is a disorder of the menstrual cycle.

According to a leading expert, a yarrow can help stimulate blood flow to the pelvis as well as the uterus and stimulate the process of menstruation. Although it has been used for centuries for this property, unfortunately, its use has not been confirmed by clinical research.

  1. IT HAS SEDATIVE EFFECTS ON SLEEP AND ANXIETY

Yarrow to treat wounds, anxiety, tension and others

If you suffer from anxiety or insomnia, we recommend that you try it. A 2012 study published in the Journal of Ethnopharmacology examined the sedative and anti-anxiety effects of yarrow in animal samples. In field trials, researchers used hydroalcoholic extracts from the aerial parts of the yarrow plant on animals.

They found that the plant had anti-anxiety effects after both short- and long-term administration. In addition, they found that yarrow had a similar effect to diazepam (Valium), a common prescription for anxiety problems.

READ ALSO: HERBAL TREATMENT OF PANIC AND STRESS
  1. HELPS REDUCE INFLAMMATION AND SUPPORTS IMMUNE FUNCTION

Yarrow to treat wounds, anxiety, tension and others

Traditional herbal medicine in China, Europe, and India uses this plant to reduce inflammation for a variety of conditions, especially inflammation of the intestines and reproductive organs in women. Having anti-inflammatory properties is one of the most important uses of yarrow.

Researchers believe that its ability to suppress inflammation is because it contains flavonoids and sesquiterpene lactone. In addition to anti-inflammatory properties, it also has astringent and firming properties. This is why it is often found in topical products for inflammatory skin problems such as eczema.

It is good to know that it is also used to treat fevers, colds, and flu.

  1. NATURALLY HELPS TREAT MASTITIS

Yarrow to treat wounds, anxiety, tension and others

Studies have shown that yarrow is very beneficial for women with mastitis. Mastitis is a type of breast infection and is more common in women who are breastfeeding. In particular, a compress made from yarrow leaves almost relieves the pain caused by mastitis and helps heal wounds and cracks in the nipple.

If you have mastitis, a smart idea is to alternate between hot and cold compresses because the cold relieves the pain while the heat increases blood flow to the breast.

In addition, this plant contains anti-inflammatory and anti-bacterial compounds.

  1. OFFERS BENEFITS TO THE DIGESTIVE SYSTEM

It is an antispasmodic activity that can be used for unwanted infections of the digestive system such as diarrhea, bloating, and constipation. Animal studies have revealed evidence that yarrow can reduce muscle contraction, which contributes to digestive disorders and even inflammatory bowel disease.

As shown in studies, it inhibits smooth muscle spasms and has a relaxing effect on the digestive system through several mechanisms, such as changes to calcium channels, cholinergic receptors, and nitric oxide production.

  1. BENEFICIAL FOR HIGH BLOOD PRESSURE AND ASTHMA

A 2013 study published in Phytotherapy research reported the effects of yarrow on lowering high blood pressure, relaxing blood vessels, and improving breathing. The study on subjects studied on animals indicates its medicinal application in cardiovascular diseases as well as respiratory disorders such as asthma.

  1. IT HAS ANTI-TUMOR PROPERTIES

Recent animal studies show that its leaf extract has antitumor properties by targeting lipid metabolism in the formation of pancreatic cancer. As studies have shown, yarrow extract helps activate regulatory pathways and promote malignancy in pancreatic cancer.

YARROW APPLICATIONS

As described above, some of the more common uses include:

  • Dermatitis
  • Indigestion and digestive problems
  • Worry
  • Insomnia
  • Menstrual status
  • Allergy
  • Cardiovascular/respiratory problems

Its uses in cooking include:

  • Its younger leaves can be used in soups and give it a pleasant taste.
  • You can use yarrow instead of tarragon in the instructions.
  • You can use its leaves in salads.

Just keep in mind when cooking that excess heat can ruin its delicious taste.

It is available in various forms such as fresh plants or flowers, dried plants, capsules, tablets, liquid extract, and tea. Also, depending on where you live, you may be able to find fresh yarrow flowers in the wild.

The usual dose of the plant for inflammatory problems is 4.5 grams per day. However, there is no recent clinical study to confirm this dose, so it is best to speak to a professional about the appropriate dose of yarrow for your specific needs.

HOW DO YOU MAKE YARROW TEA?

You can use the flowers, leaves or plant stems to make yarrow tea. It is also allowed to use dried leaves or flowers. The tea has an almost bitter taste, so if necessary, you can use honey to soften its taste. Many tea recipes include lemongrass, which boosts vitamin C and try combining yarrow, echinacea, marigold, ginger, and mint for more respiratory and digestive effects.

HOMEMADE TEA RECIPE:

Ingredients:

  • 1 teaspoon dried yarrow or 3 fresh leaves
  • 1 cup boiling water
  • 1 teaspoon honey (optional)
  • 1 slice of lemon (optional)

instructions:

Soak the yarrow in boiling water for 10 minutes and then remove the leaves. If you like, add honey and lemon juice and stir at the end.

DANGERS, SIDE EFFECTS, AND INTERACTIONS

When taken orally, yarrow can cause drowsiness and increased urination. Topical application may also cause contact dermatitis or skin irritation. If you notice bothersome symptoms, stop taking them.

If you are allergic to plants of the dandelion family and see blisters on the skin after eating it, you are likely to be allergic to the external and internal use of this plant, so be careful. This can make the skin more sensitive to sunlight.

Can yarrow poison humans? This plant is not generally considered poisonous, but care must be taken when using the oil as it contains tojeun in small amounts.

This plant also contains coumarin, which can thin the blood. Therefore, it should not be combined with blood thinners.

This plant is not recommended for pregnant women, if you are breastfeeding, talk to your doctor before taking yarrow products.

It is not usually recommended for use in children because it has not been studied to determine if it is safe for use in children.

It may interact with the following medications:

  • blood clots (such as warfarin)
  • lithium
  • Medications that lower stomach acid (such as omeprazole)
  • High blood pressure medications
  • Medicines that cause drowsiness (such as anticonvulsants and sleeping pills)

If you have a history of chronic disease or take medications regularly, talk to your doctor before taking yarrow.